Reflections on the first Sunday of Lent

This past Sunday we celebrated the first Sunday of Lent.

At church we talked about the “inner life” and the “journey inward.” Both of these phrases are not frequently used and in modern western culture are usually confusing to most people.

A New York columnist sheds some light on this when he writes:

We live in a society that encourages us to think abut how to have a great career but leaves many of us inarticulate about how to cultivate the inner life. The competition to succeed and win admiration is so fierce that it becomes all-consuming…We live in a culture that teaches us to promote and advertise ourselves and to master the skills required for success, but that gives little encouragement to humility, sympathy, and honest self-confrontation, which are necessary for building character…Years pass and the deepest parts of yourself go unexplored and unstructured. You are busy, but you have a vague anxiety that your life has not achieved it’s ultimate meaning and significance.[1] 

I look at Lent as an invitation to cultivate the inner life. I understand this “cultivation” as spiritual formation. I love Renovere’s website which states:

We are all spiritual beings. We have physical bodies, but our lives are largely driven by an unseen part of us. There is an immaterial center in us that shapes the way we see the world and ourselves, directs the choices we make, and guides our actions. Our spirit is the most important part of who we are. And yet we rarely spend time developing our inner life. That’s what Spiritual Formation is all about.

Spiritual Formation is a process, but it is also a journey through which we open our hearts to a deeper connection with God. We are not bystanders in our spiritual lives, we are active participants with God, who is ever inviting us into relationship with him.

Questions:

  1. What are some ways/practices that you use to cultivate your inner life?
  2. What does spiritual formation mean to you?
  3. How do you think people are spiritually formed?
  4. What is the result, goal, or aim of spiritual formation?

 

 

 

 

 

[1] David Brooks, The Road to Character, 92.

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